ADDRESSING SELECTION CRITERIA ► THE ‘HOW TO’ GUIDE

Welcome to your one-stop shop selection criteria ‘how to’ destination!
Addressing selection criteria is a very challenging and time-consuming process. Research has revealed that the process of addressing selection criteria (for example, five selection criteria at a maximum limit of one page for each criterion), takes the average person a solid 20+ hours of work.

That is why I have created a series of blog posts with winning selection criteria sample responses from a range of different jobs in the government and tertiary sectors. Therefore, if you are struggling to address selection criteria correctly, you’ve come to the right place and I am pleased you have found me.

BEST SELECTION CRITERIA EXAMPLES  YES THEY’RE FREE AND WIN INTERVIEWS!

Since July 2009 I have been posting winning selection criteria answers that have gained interviews for many of my clients

Please view my blog for examples on addressing selection criteria →

addressing selection criteria examples which have gained job interviews for many of my clients

ADDRESSING SELECTION CRITERIA FOR DIFFERENT SECTORS

Addressing selection criteria is required for positions in government departments (at federal, state and local levels); universities; community organisations; and larger employer groups in the private sector. Addressing selection criteria requires time, effort, patience and highly developed written communication skills. Each criterion must be addressed correctly, concisely and in the right context to showcase how you meet competencies or capabilities. Many applications that require addressing selection criteria stipulate you prepare responses that showcase your knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics (KSAOs) in relation to the role. The ‘O’ can include tangible factors such as educational qualifications, years of experience, and licences. KSAOs are more of a feature when addressing selection criteria for university applications for both academic and non-academic roles.

ADDRESSING SELECTION CRITERIA ► STAR MODEL/METHOD

STAR stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result. STAR is a popular and commonly-used model in preparing demonstrable selection criteria examples. STAR is a term used interchangeably with CAR (Circumstance, Action, Result); and SAO (Situation, Action, Outcome). Essentially, CAR and SAO models are more succinct versions of STAR; the Task forms part of the Circumstance and Situation components respectively.

Applicants are advised to address selection criteria examples using STAR (or CAR, SAO) as follows:

  • Situation – outline the situation;
  • Task – outline the overarching task you were assigned in the context of the situation;
  • Action – outline the action(s) you took to complete the task, how you undertook them and why;
  • Result – outline the result(s)/outcome(s)/benefit(s) of your action(s).

I have taken the STAR model/method one step further and named it STABR where ‘B’ stands for Barrier. Incorporating the ‘barrier’ component when preparing selection criteria answers involves outlining any barriers or challenges you had to overcome in completing the task and what you did to overcome them.

ADDRESSING SELECTION CRITERIA EXAMPLES ► SPECIFIC, RELEVANT AND CONCRETE

Selection criteria examples you prepare must be relevant, specific and demonstrable in order to showcase what you have done. Your application will not be fully assessed or well assessed when selection criteria examples are irrelevant or the material you prepare is vague and non-specific. Strong, clear and concrete responses are mandatory when preparing winning selection criteria!

On a final note, the process of preparing selection criteria examples will be way less daunting if you do the following: (1) apply the STAR or STABR model/method when answering selection criteria; and (2) read my Blog page (Addressing Selection Criteria Category), where I have posted selection criteria examples covering a wide range of positions and levels.