ADDRESSING SELECTION CRITERIA ‘MADE EASY’

Addressing selection criteria is a very challenging and time-consuming process. Research has revealed that writing selection criteria take the average person 20+ hours to prepare. I have created a series of blog posts with winning selection criteria examples across a range of roles in the government and tertiary sectors. If you are struggling to write selection criteria, you have come to the right place.
Welcome to your one-stop-shop selection criteria ‘how to’ destination!

BEST SELECTION CRITERIA EXAMPLES THEY ARE FREE AND WIN INTERVIEWS!

Since July 2009 I have been posting winning selection criteria answers that have gained interviews for many of my clients

Please view my blog for winning examples on addressing selection criteria →

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DIFFERENT SECTORS

Selection criteria are required for roles in government (federal, state, local); universities; community organisations; non-profit organisations; and large business corporations. Selection criteria must be addressed demonstrably, concisely and in the right context to showcase how you meet competencies or capabilities.

STAR MODEL/METHOD

STAR stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result. STAR is a popular and commonly-used model in preparing selection criteria examples. STAR is a term used interchangeably with CAR (Circumstance, Action, Result); and SAO (Situation, Action, Outcome). CAR and SAO models are succinct versions of STAR.

Applicants are advised to address selection criteria examples using STAR (or CAR, SAO) as follows:

  • Situation – outline the situation;
  • Task – outline the overarching task you were assigned in the context of the situation;
  • Action – outline the action(s) you took to complete the task, how you undertook them and why;
  • Result – outline the result(s)/outcome(s)/benefit(s) of your action(s).

Selection criteria examples must be relevant, specific and concrete to demonstrate what you have done. An application will not be strong if selection criteria examples are irrelevant, vague and clichéd. Strong, clear and concrete responses are mandatory when preparing winning selection criteria!